The Discipline of Hope

I’ve got a PhD in Catastrophisation and Anxiety (with distinction). Prior to Eva being diagnosed with breast cancer, I had already – years ago – envisioned Eva dying; me dying and leaving Eva with not-yet-conceived kids; our not-yet-conceived kids dying; Eva dying and leaving me with not-yet-conceived kids; my best mate dying; me losing my ability to work and support my not-yet-conceived kids, etc etc. I could easily go on.

When we received Eva’s diagnosis, my well-primed anxiety response took flight. The morning after (I think) I was with both kids by myself as Eva tried to sleep again after a restless night. I remember feeding Luca while Mia played on the floor. And I remember trying to sing and smile at Luca whilst I fought what was essentially the beginning of a panic attack. I felt this image taking over my vision: trying to raise two kids alone, who missed their mother; feeling ill-equipped and scared; trying to make up all the parenting that they would miss in Eva’s absence.

But we don’t get to fall apart. This is Eva’s battle, primarily. I’m just the cavalry, bringing up the rear. It’s my job to support her and protect the most vulnerable and precious members of our family. It’s not within the traditional role of the western male (or most cultures’ concept of masculinity) to admit to being scared shitless and scared of not coping. But I guess we’ve all had it to one degree or another. How conscious or not we are of it, and how we deal with it, is key.

Hope needs to become a discipline these days. We cannot control our circumstances but there is some room to control our reactions to them. I could expend energy imagining planning a funeral. Or I could invest energy in imagining a fit, strong Eva in twelve months’ time, back to swimming with the mum’s squad, running around with the kids, getting ready to go on well-deserved holiday. And which image will give rise to the greater feeling of anxiety in me – or us, as this battle is as acute for Eva? Unpleasant feelings are still there – uncertainty, worry, tension, grief. Hopefully by learning to sit and acknowledge those feelings, I can then proactively choose to imagine a beautiful future, rather than be riddled with the anxiety of the potentially disastrous one.

This Emily Dickenson poem was in my head this week; it is oft quoted by one of dear friends, Megan, and true to form, a letter arrived from her for Eva a couple of days after:

Hope is the thing with feathers 

That perches in the soul 

And sings the tune without the words 

And never stops at all.

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Author: smenelaws

Husband, father, friend, vicarious cancer sufferer, doctor, amateur yogi.

4 thoughts on “The Discipline of Hope”

  1. Oh Simon I want to write I can’t begin to imagine what is going on with you guys on a minute by minute basis and then I read about your experiences in such intimate detail and I then feel it.
    I hope your intimate sharing is giving you some form of relief as I wish we could take all this horrible experience away from you guys.
    Eva, Mia and Luca are a very blessed family to have you journeying with and alongside them not just coming up the rear. 😘💗💔

    Like

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